Economics and the Periodicals Price Survey of 2018

Flat budgets, price increases, and a reliance on status journals for tenure and promotion keep familiar pressures on the serials marketplace. Sound familiar? Here is a Library Journal blog post about spending on and by some libraries.

New Ways to Search Congress.gov

Have you been wishing for some better ways to search on Congress.gov? Well your prayers have been answered.  Check out their recent blog post about the new ways to search on Congress.gov.

Oh No! Not MORE Amazon!

It looks like Amazon is getting into the peer-review business and they will even use AI to make sure the reviews are authentic.  Take a look.

The Other Side of the Coin?

Publishers Weekly has an interesting story about some big publishers and how 2017 treated them.  I admit I have never given much thought to how slow and/or flat sales might impact publishers.  Luckily someone can make me with just a blog post.

Congress.gov upgrades and the April Tip

More great enhancements from Congress.gov this month!

Check out this blog post describing how they have improved the sorting of search results and the continuing work on committee authority records.  This month’s tip is about printing a list of search results from Congress.gov. All this hard work on the website is probably why my students love it so much.

Wolters Kluwer/CRIV Vendor Liaison Call Notes from 11/27/2017

CRIV/ Wolters Kluwer Semi-Annual Vendor Liaison Call
Monday November 27th, 2017
2pm Central
Participants: C.J. Pipins capipinsii@law.umaryland.edu, Kate Hagan khagan@aall.org, and Chris Pamboukes chris.pamboukes@wolterskluwer.com

Agenda
I. Welcome

II. Outstanding Requests for Advocacy – NONE

III. AALL Programs, Activities, or Business of Interest to WK
a. Getting ready for the AALL Annual Meeting in Baltimore next July. The annual meeting program committee met and selected programs for 2018. Kate will be in contact with marketing folks at WK to disucss their activities at the meeting, in late November
b. There will be a CRIV roundtable at the annual meeting in Baltimore. More details are forthcoming.
c. AALL is working on a survey to determine the State of the Profession. A group of AALL members from diverse library types is developing a survey to look at trends, challenges, and benchmarking that will be of value to our members when assessing their libraries and what they should be looking at to move their libraries forward. The hope is that it will be completed by next fall.
d. Wolters Kluwer should continue to send anything newsworthy to the AALL daily news message Know It All for distribution to AALL members. Product releases, etc. WK would like any current awareness sources from AALL.

IV. WK Programs, Activities, or Business of Interest to CRIV and/or AALL
a. WK is sun setting Intelliconnect. The Tax and Accounting platform, which looks similar to Intelliconnect, will NOT be sun setting. They will retain their tax content on that platform and that info will be mirrored on cheetah.
b. Recently WK extended the Standard Federal Tax Reporter historical content. Wolters Kluwer partnered with Hein to provide archives of materials from 1917-1985. Content includes the Internal Revenue Code, IRS publications, and the tax regulations.
c. The research folders from Intelliconnect have been renamed “worklists” for the cheetah platform. Thanks to a recent enhancement, users who do not access Cheetah through an IP range can now share and transfer ownership of worklists to others on the same account. Also, any user can go in and change their password; they no longer have to contact their account representative to get it changed.
d. WK is doing lots of academic training right now, and getting good feedback about cheetah. They are still migrating a lot of premium accounts.
Training and support Site for Cheetah
e. WK has also started focusing on more outreach to law students in addition to librarians. There are many ways to deliver law student training. Schools interested in exploring the training options should contact Chris or their Wolters Kluwer account representative.
f. ID manager 2.0 – For accounts that do not access Cheetah through an IP range, ID Manager 2.0 is a free service from WK where a librarian who is the site contact can manage their account’s user IDs. The site contact can also and go into individual’s accounts in their organization to customize that individual’s cheetah experience. This is really a back end tool to customize someone’s homepage on cheetah to highlight certain content for that person. ID manager also allows the site contact to create user IDs for individuals. To access it click ID Manager 2.0.
g. WK has cheetah widgets that provide functionality that was not previously available. You can search in a cheetah widget on your platform and you can embed the widget on a SharePoint page. That allows you to get access to the WK publications from right there. The widget is free and does not require the user to login. Widgets can help surface content for which users don’t normally search or don’t know exists. Anyone with a username and password can make a widget. Check it out here
Cheetah Widgets
h. For a while now there have been quick start cards to help users quickly see and understand the features available with a WK product. Now there are content specific quick start cards available on the training and support website. Users can also access training videos there as well. Also on this page under specialized training there is a legal pro virtual training option that specializes in one on one training with a person. Users can get a single WK-trainer who will spend 30 minutes to an hour with you. This feature is called Legal Pro Virtual Training. There are lots of options for choosing date/time, and don’t worry. Legal Pro Virtual Training does not count against your contracted hours of training and support time.
Legal Pro Virtual Training.

Wanna learn a little about Congress.gov

And one of the people who make it so great?  Check out the interview with Adrienne Keys, specialist in legislative information systems management within the Congressional Research Service (CRS) of the Library of Congress.

You can find the interview HERE