The State of Law Library eBooks 2017-18 (LLRX)

Ellyssa Kroski, the Director of Information Technology at the New York Law Institute, has recently undertaken a three-part article series at LLRX, designed to cover what law libraries should consider when evaluating and getting involved with eBooks. The first two parts have already been posted, with the third part on the way.

Read more:
Part One: The Landscape
Part One is designed to “describe the current landscape of eBooks relevant to the law library field, the benefits and challenges of offering eBooks in law libraries, the different ways to purchase law-related eBooks, and how to get started choosing a solution.”

Part Two: Brass Tacks
Part Two is designed to “discuss the different pricing models that are currently available and the pros and cons to each; subscription-based, patron-driven acquisitions, short term loans, access-to-own, etc. as well as strategies for controlling costs, and questions to ask before choosing an eBook solution.”

Part Three: What Law Libraries are Doing (forthcoming)
Part Three “will delve into what we’ve chosen to do for our eBooks program at NYLI and how that has evolved over the past five years to a hybrid model, as well as what other law libraries have chosen as their solutions.”

ProQuest acquiring Coutts and MyiLibrary, partnering with Ingram.

ProQuest announced today that it is acquiring Coutts and MyiLibrary from Ingram Content Group. It is also “entering into a strategic partnership” with Ingram for print distribution.

The press release can be read on the ProQuest website (the same release can also be read on the Ingram website).

More info on these changes from ProQuest is available here. A PDF of FAQs is available as well.

Without knowing how long this has been in the works, the easiest interpretation of this move is that it is a response to EBSCO’s purchase of YBP (see earlier coverage of that development here). ProQuest is selling this acquisition as a further expansion of its ebook content (adding MyiLibrary titles to the Ebrary and EBL titles already available from ProQuest). At the same time, these statements say that nothing will change immediately for current MyiLibrary customers. ProQuest also promises this will not delay the ongoing integration of the Ebrary and EBL platforms.

About EBSCO Buying YBP

It’s been ten days since the announcement that EBSCO bought YBP from Baker &Taylor, but the benefit of being late to comment is that we can corral much of what’s already been said.

Here is the original press release from EBSCO that it is buying YBP (including its GOBI platform) from Baker & Taylor.

Here is a PDF of FAQs for current customers.

Both of these documents promise minimal disruption in the near future.

Notably, within an hour of receiving the EBSCO press release over email, I received ProQuest’s press release assuring customers that its ongoing relationship with YBP would not change. ProQuest elaborated on this here, promising that its ebrary and EBL ebooks would continue to be available through GOBI. ProQuest is often seen as EBSCO’s big rival in academic ebooks and online journal databases, and both EBSCO’s and ProQuest’s ebook platforms have been playing reasonably nice with YBP’s GOBI platform.

Here is Baker & Taylor’s press release about the sale of YBP to EBSCO.

Meredith Schwartz at Library Journal did a write-up, with her same-day article containing quotes from three EBSCO executives, as well as an academic librarian from EBSCO’s advisory board.

AALL Program Preview: Implement/Access an E-Book Collection in a Law Library

Over the next couple days, CRIV will be highlighting some of the vendor relations-themed offerings at AALL in Seattle…

G6: Implement/Access an E-Book Collection in a Law Library
Time: 10:15am – 11:45am
Location: 618-620
Description:

Apple has sold more than 40 million iPads, and Amazon now sells more Kindle titles than print books. E-books have reached the tipping point. Libraries are watching the demand for e-book borrowing steadily rise and are responding by rolling out new e-book initiatives. Learn how to compare and evaluate e-book platforms, the ins and outs of pricing models-including demand-driven acquisitions, functionality unique to this format, and vendor types, as well as the questions you should ask about technical requirements. Become knowledgeable about the key challenges and benefits of launching an e-book initiative in your law library, as well as alternatives to purchasing e-books.

Takeaway 1: Participants will understand the various e-book vendor types, sales and pricing models- including demand-driven acquisitions, and functionality of major e-book packages.

Takeaway 2: Participants will be able to create an informed list of questions about content, functionality, and technical requirements of e-book packages to submit to vendors.

Takeaway 3: Participants will also become knowledgeable about alternatives to purchasing e-books.

Who should attend: Reference and acquisitions librarians; library administrators

Track(s): Library Management, Reference, Research and Client

Presenters:

Ellyssa Kroski, Director of Information Technology, New York Law Institute
Ralph A. Monaco, Executive Director, New York Law Institute
Jeremy Sullivan, Manager of Library Research Services, DLA Piper
David Swords, EBL—Ebook Library/ProQuest
Jacob Sayward, Head of Electronic Services, Fordham Law Library

CRIV LexisNexis Digital Library and eBooks Demo

To gain a better understanding of the functionality of the LexisNexis Digital Library and eBooks, members of the CRIV Committee met with LexisNexis earlier this month for a product demonstration. LexisNexis provided an overview and discussed the functionality from user and administrator perspectives. In June, some members of the committee will be participating in a trial of the LexisNexis Digital Library to gain first-hand experience with the product. 
 
You can find an overview of the LexisNexis Digital Library at http://www.lexisnexis.com/documents/pdf/20130524040128_large.pdf, or visit the website at http://www.lexisnexis.com/ebooks/lending/.  

If you are interested in a trial of the LexisNexis Digital Library contact your LexisNexis representative. 

LexisNexis Response to April 2013 eBook Questions – Posted on Behalf of LexisNexis

Below is Lexis’ response to the questions posed during the mid-April phone conference with members of CRIV.  CRIV would like to thank Cindy Spohr, Deana Sparling, and Silvian Rosario for taking the time to speak with CRIV and answer the questions below.  If you have questions about how these responses will impact your library, please contact your LexisNexis Representative.  If you have a concern that was not addressed here or in the February response, found here, please email Michelle Cosby, CRIV Chair at mcosby@nccu.edu.

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LexisNexis would like to thank Michelle Cosby and CRIV for the opportunity to continue the conversation on eBooks.  The questions discussed during the recent call and answers to them follow.

For additional information, we recommend you visit http://www.lexisnexis.com/ebooks/ , where you can access current lists of electronic titles, view an eBook demonstration, and review Frequently Asked Questions.  Additionally, you may find answers to your questions in the terms and conditions (the “Electronic Publications Master Agreement”) related to eBooks (as well as CDs, DVDs, PDFs, flash drives or other publications distributed electronically by LN) located at http://lexisnexis.com/terms/bender/masteragreement/.  We also welcome your questions and suggestions by phone at 800.833.9844 or email to ebooks@lexisnexis.com.

Q: Concerns were raised regarding the administration of eNewsletters and eBooks.

A:  LexisNexis® digital content (eBooks and PDFs) is fulfilled and supported via the LexisNexis download center. This download center can be accessed through our online store. Since its launch in November 2011, we have continuously made incremental updates to improve the download capabilities for our digital content. In summer of 2013, we are planning to significantly enhance the user experience related to the download management process for eMedia.  The planned enhancements will include a self-help portal for administrative staff that will, among other things, allow the admin to change, edit, add and delete email user addresses receiving notifications from the download center. Customers will also be able to view a history of all their eBook purchases in the download center and be able to download any previous newsletter updates they may have missed.

Q: How are customers notified of a change in format for an existing subscription?

A: Newsletters:  When a newsletter format is changed so that it is only available in an eNewsletter (PDF) format, LexisNexis’s process is that customers are notified, individually, with a letter included in the last print shipment. For example, the customer will receive a notification of the format change with the April 2013 print newsletter that the next issue, May 2013, will only be available as an e-newsletter in PDF format. The timing of the notification is dependent on the publication schedule of the newsletter. A complete list of titles in this category is posted to http://www.lexisnexis.com/eBooks.

Print + CD: When a Print + CD title is migrated to a Print + eBook format, LexisNexis’s process for notification is that customers are sent a letter, with the print title, with instructions to download the eBook. Upcoming titles are posted to http://www.lexisnexis.com/eBooks.

Q: Concerns were raised that the list of titles changing to eFormat is not being kept up-to-date.

A:  We aim to post a list of titles earmarked for migration approximately 30 days in advance, as our information allows. We do this through our eBooks site at http://www.lexisnexis.com/eBooks.

 

Q: Concerns were raised that Libraries will be forced to print newsletters at their own expense. 

A: With a single subscription to a newsletter, the library has the right to use the Electronic Publication on a single personal computer, e-reader, tablet, mobile device, or other display device, in the manner described in the Electronic Publications Master Agreement. In addition, one copy can be printed. While there is no requirement that the library make one print out of the newsletter, we do understand that some libraries may elect to do so. 

If a library is interested in lending and sharing capabilities for eBooks and eNewsletters, the LexisNexis® Digital Library can simplify buying, updating and lending.  Find more information on the LexisNexis Digital Library here:  http://www.lexisnexis.com/ebooks/lending/

Q: Concerns were raised that due to the change to eFormat, libraries will need to purchase e-readers.

A: A particular brand of e-reader is not required as programs that act as e-readers are available for computers. For more information, visit the eBook Resource page: http://www.lexisnexis.com/ebooks/resources/.

Q: Concerns were raised regarding highlighting in digital content.

A: The Digital Rights Management (DRM) related to a publication dictates the ability to highlight, share, print, etc. For a single user, single copy subscription, only one user has the right to use the eBook, so only one person can highlight. (However, for libraries permitting access under section 1.3 of the Electronic Publications Master Agreement, the permitted user highlights would be displayed together, much as they would if multiple patrons marked on and highlighted a printed book.) With the LexisNexis® Digital Library, users have the ability to highlight and make notes, which can be saved by the user outside the eBook. These notes and highlights are suppressed when the book is checked back in, so the next user will not see this information and is able to make their own comments and highlights. If the original user checks the eBook out again from the LexisNexis Digital Library he/she will have access to the highlights/notes originally made.

Q: Concerns were raised on electronic invoicing.

A: For some organizations, Lexis Advance® invoices will be sent electronically in summer of 2013. However, the invoice format for print, eBook, eNewsletters is not changing.  You will continue to receive these invoices in print.

 

Q: Can the abbreviations on invoices be more specific?  (The example provided was MA Laws)

A: Within some constraints, we can make adjustments as needed so that the abbreviation is more descriptive.  For the example raised of MA Laws, the abbreviated title on the invoice has been changed to MA Annotated Laws.

 

Q: What action should be taken by subscribers who choose not to accept a change in format for existing subscriptions?

A: Customers who choose to seek a refund or cancel their subscription due to a change in format should call Customer support at 800.833.9844 for options related to their purchase.

A Message From the Chair: LexisNexis eBooks

CRIV is still waiting for Lexis’ response to the questions posed during the phone call in mid-April.  In the meantime, CRIV has scheduled a demo with Lexis in May to become more familiar with how the eBooks Library works so that we can better understand the needs of the AALL Membership.  If your library would like a personalized demo, please contact your Lexis Rep.  Alternatively, Lexis will be offering demos in June.  More information to come on the June demos.

Additionally, CRIV is still soliciting feedback on this issue.  If you have any concerns or suggestions, please email them to Michelle Cosby, CRIV Chair at mcosby@nccu.edu.

Thank you,

Michelle Cosby, CRIV Chair